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Location:
Indianapolis
Website:
Medium:
Book Arts
Availability:
From the artisan
FEATURED WORK
Megan Winn

“The fact that people write their days, tell their stories, and document their lives in books that my hands created with love is exhilarating and deeply rewarding for me as an artisan and as a person.”

Megan Winn’s work of the heart has become her work of art.

She began recording her thoughts and tracking her activities in a journal when she was nine years old, and she hasn’t stopped the daily practice. About 10 years ago she started making journals for herself, friends and family. When Megan participated in a workshop on simple historical binding techniques, she was hooked.

“I am inspired by the tactile nature of books, the thrill of hunting down gorgeous remnants of leather, and the texture of handmade paper,” the Marion County artisan said. “My inner collector thrives on getting to sift through Indiana’s antique and salvage stores looking for the perfect metal piece, rusty washer or skeleton key to use as closures for my books.”

She uses reclaimed and remnant leather for the covers due to its durability and heritage throughout the ages. Rough-textured pages inside the journals incorporate various handmade and eco-friendly papers.

“I am a deep lover of my craft, and each of my books carries that quality of care,” Megan said.

She is proud to be an artist in Indiana, and having her handmade books carry the Indiana Artisan brand roots her work in the state, she explained.

“I could do what I do from anywhere with access to the Internet,” Megan added. “Being designated an Indiana Artisan connects me to the deep history of entrepreneurship that the state is known for and also makes me want to promote even more awareness of the vibrant art scene that exists around the state.”

She was drawn to the organization when she was starting her business, The Binding Bee, because of how it supports the arts and because Megan wanted to be more connected to the greater community of working artists around the Hoosier state.