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DEJA VU ART AND FINE CRAFT SHOW TO FEATURE FIVE INDIANA ARTISANS

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Work by Indiana Artisans includes cuff links like these created by Nancy Lee, whose jewelry is hand-fabricated from metals, then textured, soldered or riveted, filed, sanded, set with gemstones or embellished in other ways, such as with found objects.

(Nov. 12, 2013)  Five Indiana Artisans will join nearly 75 at this Saturday’s Déjà Vu Art and Fine Craft Show in Columbus.  Held in The Commons, in the downtown Columbus Arts District, the show runs from 10 – 4, featuring work by artists who reuse or recycle materials to create their art, hence the event name Déjà Vu.

Artists from Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky will exhibit and sell assemblage, fiber art, glass art, jewelry, sculpture, wearable art, weaving, and woodworking.  Participating Indiana Artisans include Larry Agnello, who creates one-of-a-kind assemblage sculptures; Carolyn and Don Madvig, who use papers and other found material in creating notecards, frames and boxes; Donna Jo Copeland, who uses wool from sheep she raises on her Breezy Manor Farm to create wearable and decorative fiber arts; Chris Gustin, who weaves wearable and decorative fiber art from a wide variety of recycled material (think all your daily newspaper plastic wrappers woven into a weather-proof front porch rug); and Nancy Lee, whose jewelry is hand-fabricated from metals, then textured, soldered or riveted, filed, sanded, set with gemstones or embellished in other ways, such as with found objects.

The featured artist is Aaron Shufelt, whose North Carolina glass studio sits atop a retired landfill, using the methane gas to fire his furnace.  Columbus is leveraging the tourism and art potential of glass for possible economic and land development, and Shufelt’s story is an example of what Bartholomew and other Indiana counties can do.  His participation is in celebration of America Recycles Day.

Organizers hope Shufelt’s story will encourage Columbus officials to consider new uses for the former Bartholomew County Landfill. His Dillsboro, North Carolina-based studio uses methane gas, a byproduct of decomposing materials buried in landfills, as a valuable resource.  To capture and convert the gas for useful, creative purposes, the Jackson County Energy Park in Dillsboro built greenhouses and craft studios atop a capped landfill. Employees recover the landfill gas and heat their greenhouses with it. Besides Shufelt, additional resident artists use the methane to forge metal, fire pottery and create glass.

Shufelt was invited to participate in Déjà Vu Art and Fine Craft Show, because administrators at the Bartholomew County Solid Waste Management District are considering a facility similar to the Jackson County Energy Park.  When a landfill is capped, the resulting methane is released into the air or burned off, so capturing the landfill gas in Bartholomew County would be better for the environment. Recycling it will provide income for the county, and an arts incubator or craft studio would encourage tourism.

If constructed, the arts incubator would be built at the capped landfill located near Petersville, east of Columbus. Supporters of the facility intend for Shufelt’s participation to give the general public and county officials the opportunity to see his work and learn about the Jackson County Energy Park.